“We have to go to the Bible not only for answers, but for questions”

[…] when we use the Bible as an answer book for the questions it does not consider important, we not only miss out on God’s best answers; we end up despairing of the Bible’s usefulness altogether. In other words, we have to go to the Bible not only for answers, but for questions. We need to find out what the most important – indeed, the most practical – issues really are.

The problem the Bible tackles is this: “There is no one righteous, not even one; there is no one who understands, no one who seeks God. All have turned away, they have together become worthless; there is no one who does good, not even one.” “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” “For the wages of sin is death.” (Rom. 3:10-12, 23; 6:23). That’s the problem as God sees it.

Made in America, Michael Scott Horton, p. 50

Oct02

One Response to ““We have to go to the Bible not only for answers, but for questions””

  1. It is true that we go to the Bible at least as much for questions as we do for answers. Not only that – but it creates a curiosity to ask more questions and to look for deeper answers. To that extent it is like drinking a soft drink which only makes you thirstier.

    Furthermore, I am becoming increasingly convinced that spiritual maturity brings with it a comfort with the unanswered questions. If we do not know the answers – at least we know who holds them.

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